White supremacy was a Trojan horse at Facebook.

White supremacy was a Trojan horse at Facebook.

Imagine a Facebook where the major decision-makers, policy advisers, and public relations folks weren’t one hundred percent wealthy white people. Imagine a Facebook where half of these folks were black, Latinx, Muslim, and immigrants. Imagine that when racist, anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim propaganda began to appear on Facebook back in 2010, 2013, or 2015, that when CEO and Founder Mark Zuckerberg asked what Facebook should do about it, the team he asked wasn’t the all-white team he asked, but a team that has experience with racism, discrimination, hate crimes, political assassination, and genocide. But as we know, that’s not what happened. A new article in the New York Times shows us all of the bad decision-making that led to the consequences we all live with today.

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Yes, your Republican family member is a monster.

Yes, your Republican family member is a monster.

In a single day, I heard three white women declare that Republicans are not monsters.

“I’m not a monster,” a white woman in one of my Facebook mom groups typed in a comment on a post about Republicans. The women in the group are professionals. Most of us hate Trump. A growing number of us are persistently vocal about our disgust with Republicans for their complicity in harm to marginalized people. We see no real difference between enthusiastically supporting racist policies and expressing concern about these policies but ultimately pulling the trigger to vote for them.

Earlier that same day, another white woman I know defended her Republican family members on Facebook, saying that they’re not monsters.

Later, I listened to an interview on NPR where a young white woman talked about how—after meeting some Republicans at work—she learned that, unlike she had been raised to believe by her liberal family, Republicans aren’t monsters, and so she’s now open to voting for them. 

These women gaslight us to protect their monsters.

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